Posts tagged ‘cranberries’

November 28, 2010

Polly’s Cranberry-Rosemary Glaze for Tofurkey

by cillefish

tofurkey with a cranberry glaze
Originally a pork glaze, this recipe evolved through 2 or 3 of my friends and acquaintances to make something truly wondrous out of the common-or-garden Tofurkey. Great on its own as a normal glaze, it also combines incredibly well with the Tofurkey’s gravy to make a sweet, tasty sauce. (See the end of this post for easy vegetarian side-dish suggestions for a vegetarian “traditional” Thanksgiving.)

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small white onion, sliced pretty thin and then chopped stir-fry style
  • 3/4 cup vegetable broth (save the rest of the broth for stuffing)
  • 1 can cranberry sauce
  • 2 Tbsp rosemary
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • Juice of 1/2 large (or 1 small) orange
     
  • 2-3 large carrots, chopped
  • 1-2 lb red potatoes (5-7 of the little kind), chopped into large cubes

1. Sauté the onion in the oil until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the vegetable broth, cranberry sauce, rosemary, and orange zest and juice and bring to a boil, mixing thoroughly.
Reduce heat and simmer until sauce loses its watery texture and just starts to congeal into a jelly-like texture.

2. Remove gravy from heat and make stuffing.

3. Prepare the Tofurkey:
Stuff (or don’t stuff) tofurkey, as you prefer.
Arrange Tofurkey in a medium-sized baking dish, surrounding it with chopped carrots and potatoes.
Pour over everything the vegan “giblet” gravy that came with the tofurkey, then pour the cranberry mix over everything as well.
Cover baking dish with foil. Wrap stuffing in foil, separately, as well.
Bake Tofurkey for 45 min to 1 hour, until vegetables are cooked, adding foil-wrapped stuffing in for the final 30 min.

4. To serve, slice Tofurkey VERY thin. Place vegetables and cranberry gravy into a separate dish.
________

Suggestions:

What to make with this for a simple but “complete” vegetarian traditional-Thanksgiving dinner (some of these aren’t vegan):

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November 28, 2010

Zesty Pecan Apple Cranberry Stuffing

by cillefish

apple cranberry stuffing
This is a very easy and tasty alternative to the usual “unecessarily salty onion blah blah” box stuffings (even though it sort of involves a box stuffing). We played it by ear, so you can adjust the ingredients as you see fit:
In a medium or large saute pan, combine:

  • 2 Tbsp butter (optional)
  • 1/4 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 cup apple juice (optional)

Bring to a boil. Add:

  • 2 sweet apples, diced super small (I like honeycrisp or ginger gold)
  • 1/2 cup whole-cranberries sauce
  • 1/4 cup pecans, toasted (for 5-10 min on 200° F, if you can’t find the pre-toasted type) and chopped to peanut size or smaller,
  • 1/2 package Stuffing Mix (the kind with a bit of seasoning, but not the “Super Garlic Awesome Sodiumfest 12 Ingredients Explosion” sort – Trader Joe’s is fine)
  • Zest of 1/2 orange (optional – omit if you’re also making Polly’s Cranberry-Rosemary Glaze)

Toss around for a minute, then cover and remove from heat. Let sit 5 minutes, then use to fill your turkey or tofurkey (the Tofurkey’s own stuffing is very tasty, so you can leave that in and just make the extra stuffing for the side, if you prefer not to cut the tofurkey in half). Wrap any extra stuffing in foil to warm during the final 20 minutes of your protein item’s cooking.

September 6, 2010

Cranberry-Walnut Apple Bagels (and tips for better bagel dough)

by cillefish

*
I made some more homemade bagels (recipe here), this time adding:

  • 1 smallish (fuji-sized) Gala apple, cored, peeled** and minced
  • 1/3 cup dried sweetened cranberries, chopped up a bit
  • 1/3-1/2 cup walnuts, chopped up so the largest bits are about 1/2- to whole-peppercorn size, max.
  • most of a 1/4 tsp measure of each: cardamom and ground powdered/dried ginger.
  • 5 or so good strokes on the nutmeg-grater of fresh nutmeg, or a SMALL pinch of the pre-ground stuff (but you should get a nutmeg grater and do it yourself because the flavor is WAY better)

These are SO GOOD with butter and honey on them. Great on their own, too; the spices are barely-there, which is good; you could add more if you want, but I think they’ll be a bit obtrusive if you push it.

I came across a few recipes that added a little bit of sugar to the boiling water, so I tried that. The sugar perhaps helps give the bagels a bit more of that slightly-shiny, crusty outside, but the effect wasn’t extremely noticeable.

Notes and Tips on the Dough

I was thinking the extra ingredients would require me to add more water than the 1 1/4 cup I used last time, but I think because the apple and cranberry both carry some moisture (the nuts do, too), it actually requires LESS. I threw in the whole 1 1/2 cup of warm water, and it was way too much. I had to add in almost a half cup of flour, plus maybe 1/2 tsp of vegetable oil to get things back to a relatively-ok consistency.

My issues with the dough this time around reminded me that if you don’t know what good bagel dough is SUPPOSED to look like, getting it right can be a little tricky if you’re used to making other breadlike things that tend to be spongier. My instinct is always to make the bagel dough too wet. RESIST.

It is too wet if it’s sticking to your hands, and way too wet if it’s wanting to STAY stuck to your hands or develop a buildup on them, and makes noisy sucking sounds when you pull your knuckles out of it as you knead. It should barely be a little stick-ish, but should have a polite attitude about it: “you know I’d like to stick to your hands, but I’m too well-bred to do that, and because I’m such a good dough, you can knead me quickly and assertively, and I won’t even stick to your Pyrex bowl.”

Good bagel dough should be dense and stretchy:

…and definitely more dry than sticky, and barely a little shiny once it’s been kneaded fully:

* The photo at the top is of someone else’s cranberry-only homemade bagels, but they look pretty close to mine (mine were a little pinker because of the bit of spices and because the walnuts darkened the flour a bit). Mine got eaten up too fast for me to photograph.

** I peel it with a knife and eat the peel because it’s good for me, and because my landlord stopped letting us put greenwaste in his garden.

August 5, 2010

“Everything but the Kitchen Sink” Cookies

by cillefish

(from New Frontiers Natural Marketplace in SLO). These are really similar to my oatmeal, brown sugar, & chocolate chip cookies. The addition of the coconut gives them a tiny bit of macaroon-esque sponginess, but the walnut tanginess plus the salt made them barely a little bitter, so I’d recommend omitting the salt and probably cutting out a tablespoon or two of the butter.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 Tablespoons cream
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1 cup fine coconut flakes (I chopped mine superfine because I don’t like strandy, dental-floss-like bits of coconut)
  • 1 cup dried cranberries (I chopped these up a bit, too)
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional; I minced superfine. You can also replace with white chocolate chips)

Equipment

  • parchment paper
  • electric mixer
  • cooling rack

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Sift flour and set aside.

3. Using medium speed on electric mixer, cream together butter and sugars until fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add vanilla, eggs, and cream; mix thoroughly. Add sifted flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt; mix on low until completely incorporated.

4. Stir in oats and any or all of the remaining ingredients to personalize cookies.

5. Using hands or ice-cream scoop, form dough into 1.5oz. balls (about 1 1/2 tablespoon) and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet (or an ungreased one). Flatten balls down evenly with your fingers or with the back of a lightly floured wooden spoon.

6. In preheated oven, bake for 16 minutes or until an even, barely-golden brown; halfway through baking time, turn baking sheets. Remove from oven and cool cookies on a wire rack.