Archive for ‘Breakfast’

March 1, 2011

Myth Muffins

by cillefish

I got a muffin pan today for 50 cents at the big Goodwill, and I’d been just waiting for a chance like this to try out this muffin recipe. They’re “real” muffins – no butter & not oversweet; they’re filling and have “oomph.”

Click the “read more” link for a vegan version: a pumpkin pie spice muffin recipe my housemate & I thought up.

Basic Muffins

The creator’s suggestion is to freeze them and grab one in the morning as breakfast.
Makes: 12 large muffins.

Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup apple sauce (use the kind that doesn’t show sugar / corn syrup in the ingredients list)
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup water*
     
  • 3 cups wheat bran (available at most natural foods stores – I get mine at the co-op on Broad)
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup loose packed brown sugar
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
     
  • 1 cup fresh fruit or 1/2 cup dried fruit, pre-soaked
    read more »

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September 6, 2010

Cranberry-Walnut Apple Bagels (and tips for better bagel dough)

by cillefish

*
I made some more homemade bagels (recipe here), this time adding:

  • 1 smallish (fuji-sized) Gala apple, cored, peeled** and minced
  • 1/3 cup dried sweetened cranberries, chopped up a bit
  • 1/3-1/2 cup walnuts, chopped up so the largest bits are about 1/2- to whole-peppercorn size, max.
  • most of a 1/4 tsp measure of each: cardamom and ground powdered/dried ginger.
  • 5 or so good strokes on the nutmeg-grater of fresh nutmeg, or a SMALL pinch of the pre-ground stuff (but you should get a nutmeg grater and do it yourself because the flavor is WAY better)

These are SO GOOD with butter and honey on them. Great on their own, too; the spices are barely-there, which is good; you could add more if you want, but I think they’ll be a bit obtrusive if you push it.

I came across a few recipes that added a little bit of sugar to the boiling water, so I tried that. The sugar perhaps helps give the bagels a bit more of that slightly-shiny, crusty outside, but the effect wasn’t extremely noticeable.

Notes and Tips on the Dough

I was thinking the extra ingredients would require me to add more water than the 1 1/4 cup I used last time, but I think because the apple and cranberry both carry some moisture (the nuts do, too), it actually requires LESS. I threw in the whole 1 1/2 cup of warm water, and it was way too much. I had to add in almost a half cup of flour, plus maybe 1/2 tsp of vegetable oil to get things back to a relatively-ok consistency.

My issues with the dough this time around reminded me that if you don’t know what good bagel dough is SUPPOSED to look like, getting it right can be a little tricky if you’re used to making other breadlike things that tend to be spongier. My instinct is always to make the bagel dough too wet. RESIST.

It is too wet if it’s sticking to your hands, and way too wet if it’s wanting to STAY stuck to your hands or develop a buildup on them, and makes noisy sucking sounds when you pull your knuckles out of it as you knead. It should barely be a little stick-ish, but should have a polite attitude about it: “you know I’d like to stick to your hands, but I’m too well-bred to do that, and because I’m such a good dough, you can knead me quickly and assertively, and I won’t even stick to your Pyrex bowl.”

Good bagel dough should be dense and stretchy:

…and definitely more dry than sticky, and barely a little shiny once it’s been kneaded fully:

* The photo at the top is of someone else’s cranberry-only homemade bagels, but they look pretty close to mine (mine were a little pinker because of the bit of spices and because the walnuts darkened the flour a bit). Mine got eaten up too fast for me to photograph.

** I peel it with a knife and eat the peel because it’s good for me, and because my landlord stopped letting us put greenwaste in his garden.

August 31, 2010

Adaptable & Chewy Homemade Granola Bars

by cillefish


Here’s my take on someone else’s take on a granola bar recipe by King Arthur Flour (I hear their whole wheat muffins are knockout, too). Eventually I’ll get around to trying those granola recipes from a few weeks ago; I’m sure some of them would be great as bars …

Easy, Chewy Granola Bars

Makes: 1 small pan

  • 1 2/3 cups quick rolled oats (if gluten-free, be sure to use gluten-free oats. I think you can get away with normal oats if you triple the water?)
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup granulated sugar (use more for store-granola-bar-sweet. I wanted way, way, less, so I substituted this with 2 packets of Splenda and added a tablespoon of maple syrup later)
  • 1/3 cup oat flour (or 1/3 cup oats, processed till finely ground in a food processor, blender, or mortar and pestle) I used the mortar and pestle, and added the 1/8 cup rice flour I had made ages ago.
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (I omitted it; the PB has enough salt)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Smidgin of freshly ground nutmeg
  • 2 to 3 cups dried fruits and nuts (total of 10 to 15 ounces – I did 2/3 cup slivered almonds, 2/3 cups walnuts minced fine, and just under 2/3 cups finely chopped coconut. It came out cohesive but a little dry; you need some fruit in there to make it really “chewy”)
  • 1/3 cup peanut butter or another nut butter, optional (I used chunky peanut butter)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract, optional
  • 6 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1/4 cup honey, maple syrup or corn syrup (I did honey, half safflower and half sage since I like that darker, nuttier taste. Sage is on the light side; safflower is pretty strong, so if you use all-safflower, might want to cut down on this and up the water a bit.)
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup (I used 3 of light maple syrup)
  • 1 tablespoon water (I forgot this part. oops)

1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Line an 8″ x 8″ x 2″ pan with parchment paper; lightly grease it with the paper from the butter.

2. In one bowl, combine all dry ingredients; in another, smaller one, all wet (peanut butter is wet). Mix each thoroughly; for the wet, mash the peanut butter so it incorporates as much as it can. Thoroughly mix the wet into the dry.

3. Put mix into parchment-lined baking pan and press down using the back of a largish spoon, saran wrap, or your hand covered with a sandwich bag (or your hand, if you don’t mind losing some of your creation on your hand and having to lick it off). Bake for 30-40 min until golden brown on edges. They can be dark / toasted-looking, depending on what you put into it — when they’re done, they should give a little in the middle, and still be softish from the heat, but they should have hardened up enough that it’s reasonable to think they’ll harden completely when they’ve cooled.

4. Cool completely on a cookie rack; if it’s necessary, chill in fridge 30 min to ensure they’re totally cool. Cut with a serrated knife. To store, wrap individually an keep in an airtight container in fridge. They freeze well.

August 22, 2010

Easy(ish) Homemade Water Bagels

by cillefish

good bagels are shiny, dense, and a little chewy.The grocery store in my new-ish neighborhood has lame bagels and I’m too cheap to get the good ones from the bagel place, so I tried 2 different kinds of homemade bagels. The easier one turned out great (and I don’t have preternatural abilities with baked goods).

You can use this recipe below (adapted from the one here) or Emeril’s water bagels here; I’ve tried both, but I liked this one because its results turned out better for me, it involved fewer and easier steps, and Emeril’s wanted to be a bit too pretzel-like in the texture of the inside. No bueno. A bready bagel is a bad bagel, and Emeril’s were a little bready. That said, if you don’t want to have to knead a little, go with his version.

Edit: There’s also a great guide to bagel making on Epicurious

Homemade Basic Water Bagels

makes: 8 || prep time: about 1.5 hrs, half of which you’re just doing other things waiting for the yeast to do its thing

For bagels:

  • 4 cups bread flour
  • 1 Tbls sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsps salt
  • 1 Tbls vegetable oil
  • 2 tsps instant yeast (most yeast these days is instant yeast, which eliminates the need for soaking the yeast before mixing
  • the dough. You don’t need to go for the “rapid rise” type — I used the normal stuff and it worked out just fine.)
  • 1-1/4- 1-1/2 cups of warm water.

For poaching liquid (optional):

  • 2-3 quarts water
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp honey
  • 1 Tbsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt

1. Mix all ingredients in a bowl. The dough should feel stiff, but if it’s unworkable and you can’t get all the dry flour to mix in, add a bit of extra water.

→ My notes: don’t add water just because the dough is on the dry-ish side; only if you have flour that refuses to cohere to the dough at all. As you knead it and the dough figures itself out on the microscopic level, it will become more supple, then slowly become smooth. give it a chance; this dough is supposed to be heavy, dense, and almost playdoh-like in its dryness. (Still not sure it’s right? Check out my later post with more bagel doughmaking tips.)

2. Drop the dough onto the counter and knead for about 10 minutes until uniformly smooth.

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