Archive for ‘Gluten-Free’

March 3, 2013

Frittata, Frittata, Frittata, Je T’aime

by cillefish

For the frittata-uninitiated, these are basically quiches without crusts — firm, cakelike omelets cooked slowly over low heat. My first efforts at these resulted in scrambled eggs, but a good frittata actually can be super simple and surprisingly classy for something so packed full of good things. Tips to simplify:
Frittata

  • The right hardware: A big, cured skillet is best for this recipe since the frittata turns out particularly attractive if you sit it under the broiler for a minute or two, and I don’t trust teflon or the “wrap the plastic handle in foil” method not to do nasty things in the oven.
  • Butter is better: If your skillet isn’t (or is) well cured, barely-browning some butter in the bottom of the pan right before you pour in the egg mix will help it stay loose and come out a little easier.
  • Implements that help: A big, flexible pancake spatula is also a plus here, as is one of those knives that looks like a soft-cheese knife but has very good, small serrations on the bottom for astoundingly excellent julienne-slicing.
  • Shortcut: For the faint of heart or accident-prone [me], the baking method also works: butter a deep pie dish, do whatever stovetop prep is necessary to get the veggies where you want them, and pop the whole thing, uncovered, into a 350° oven for, say, 30min.

Spinach, Red Pepper, Onion, and Feta Frittata:

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 medium yellow onions, halved vertically and thinly sliced
  • 2 red bell pepper, quartered lengthwise and sliced very thinly
  • 10 oz frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed out (I up it to 15oz)
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1/4 to 1/2 c crumbled feta
  • optional: 1 Tbsp pre-grated parmesan
  • optional: 1/4 c to 1/2 c chopped fresh parsley, or 1-2 Tbsp dried (I omit this)
  • 1 tsp italian seasoning (I used 1 heaping tsp)
  • Pepper to taste or a pinch of crushed chili pepper (the egg can handle it)
  • 1 Tbsp unsalted butter

Preparation:

  1. Pop the spinach in a bowl in the microwave on half-power to start it thawing. Meanwhile, chop everything. More Frittata goodness
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May 20, 2012

Spicy Orange Salad

by cillefish

This is awesome: simple, awesome, and summery. And awesome. It’s based on a salad common in Morocco, Spain, and places between.

Sweet oranges give a tang that enhances the spiciness of green onion and chili pepper, and pepitas add a bit of crunch. This is ased on the recipe here, plus some tweaks based on 2 orange salad recipes in the NY Times.

We made this for Mother’s Day along with the gouda-red-onion quesadillas and garlicky black beans.

Ingredients:

  • 5 blood oranges or navel oranges, peeled thoroughly, quartered, and sliced 1/4″ width-wise
  • 2 green onions, chopped up to about 1/4″ or thinner using kitchen scissors (for the white parts, first remove and discard oot nubbin and halve the white part lengthwise)
  • 1/2 tsp dried crushed red chili pepper
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp etra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 to 1/2 c pepitas (uncooked pumpkin seeds) or other toasted nuts such as walnuts
  • 1/4 to 1/2 c dried raisins

Method:

  • Combine all ingredients in a bowl and toss thoroughly.
  • Cover and chill in refrigerator for a minimum of 30min (also delicious the day after).
  • Serve chilled.
February 18, 2012

Sesame Deviled Eggs

by horseradishsauce

You know, “deviled” should have geminate <l>s because the single <l> brings the <i>, /ɪ/, to the front, leading <deviled> to be pronounced [di,vaɪ’ɫd] instead of [dɛ’vɪɫd,]. As you can see, the stress also switches to the second syllable with one <l>.
In other words, it should be “devilled eggs”. Yes. Spell-check put angry red dots beneath it to tell me I’m wrong.

Man, now every time I see “deviled” in this post, I think [di,vaɪ’ɫd] which makes me think of “defiled eggs” instead.

Anyway, as you know, if I’m making food that isn’t a dessert, I’m making it for my, myself and I. We don’t mind crappy presentation as long as it tastes good and makes our tummies smile. We are generally lazy when it comes to feeding ourselves and would rather eat Ants on a Log or trailmix every day for the rest of our lives than spend over 15-20 minutes cooking food. Unless it’s something we can put on a pot and simmer and forget about it and take it off in 8 hours and eat it. We attribute this characteristic to our habit of rising at 0415, working out twice a day, and getting home at about 1900.

Sesame Deviled Eggs

  • 2 hard-boiled eggs
  • 1/2-1 teaspoon fish sauce (add more for more saltiness)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • roasted sesame seeds
  • freshly-ground black pepper, to taste

If you’re lazy, put the eggs into a bowl or plate and chop them up. Drizzle and sprinkle the other ingredients on top and toss it. Eat it. If you’re not lazy, take out the yolks and mash it with everything else, to taste. Stuff it back inside the albuminoid (while we often call it the albumin, it technically contains albumin, making it an albuminoid). While I recommend putting the seeds inside the yolk mash, you could sprinkle more sesame seeds on top for garnish.

I’ve got a super special awesome Mexican Black Bean Soup I’m making right now. I’ll post the recipe tomorrow as well as some homemade flavored instant oatmeal to bring to work in case you get tired of all the shit that Quaker or the grocery store’s brand put in their packaged ones.

But for now, it’s time to go climb trees in Nashville. Ta-ta.

February 5, 2012

Chickpea Soup

by horseradishsauce

This is a nice little soup I made this morning because I only have cabbage in my fridge. When I was in Greece last summer, we ate mostly beans cooked in a variety of ways, but always with olive oil and oregano.

Since I used dried chickpeas, I had to start the night before. You could use canned chickpeas, but I find that the flavor is not as nice and they have a lot more salt.

Chickpea Soup

Yield: About 3 servings, depending on what you consider a serving.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dried chickpeas or 2 cups cooked/canned
  • 1/2 cup onion (any variety), chopped into large chunks
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly-ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil (or about 3-4 fresh basil leaves, torn up)
  • a dash of salt

If you’re using dried chickpeas, soak them the night before in 3 cups of water. In the morning, rinse them (if you’re using canned, rinse those as well) and add 3 1/2 cups of water and the onions. Simmer them for about 30 minutes in a pot with the lid on but tilted (even if it has a steam hole), then stir in the oil and seasonings. Let it simmer for another 15 minutes, or until the beans are the texture you prefer. Consume.